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Wednesday, 4 November 2009

Quality, Choice and Aspiration

Graphic:  Front page illustration of the document.Or as the subtitle reads, "A strategy for young people’s information, advice and guidance." At 52 pages this is a serious read that all involved in the education of children should be aware of. Click here to download the .pdf file.

The document outlines yet more initiatives to be included within an already crowded curriculum. That said, it identifies issues that most schools are taking on board or have had as part of their Careers responsibilities for some years. Careers teachers and counsellors will probably shout out, 'What do you think we've been doing for the past 20-30 years? It talks, correctly about the need to help young people to be aware of the opportunities available to them and repeatedly encourages teachers, parents and students to "think outside of the box".

As the introduction says: "Young people need high quality information, advice and guidance (IAG) to help them find their way in the world and make decisions that will set them on the path to success. We want young people to access the support and opportunities they need to:
  • succeed in education and continue participating in learning until the age of 18
  • make informed choices about their careers and be prepared for the demands of working life
  • raise their aspirations and fulfil their potential
  • overcome barriers that may be preventing them from releasing their talents."
Taken as a set of guidelines, this is basically a common-sense document about communication skills, how schools and employers relate to each other, how parents and pupils are encouraged to gain impartial and appropriate advice.

Every page is about communication, BUT, as with many government documents it leaves open the question of how best to encourage processes of communication. For me, every single page is shouting out, 'Why not use an e-Portfolio?'

2 comments:

Gill said...

Absolutely Ray! Too many people still think of 'career' as a job or profession. 'Career' means everything you do in life: learning, work, volunteering, skills building, interests and personal achievements.. this is what schools are there to develop in young people surely.. so why is 'careers' still branded as optional in many schools? And why do people still question the need for lifelong, lifewide e-portfolios? Gill

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